Fruit Plot: Plotting Using Multiple PNGs

In one of our previous posts (Halloween: An Excuse for Plotting with Icons), we gave a quick tutorial on how to plot using icons using ggplot. A reader, Dr. D. K. Samuel asked in a comment how to use multiple icons. His comment read,

…can you make a blog post on using multiple icons for such data
year, crop,yield
2000, Tomato,600
2000,Apple, 800
it will be nice to use icons for each data point. It will also be nice if the (icon) data could be colored by year.

This blog post will address this request. First, the result…


The process I used to create this plot is as follows:

  1. Find the icons that you want to use in place of the points on your scatterplot (or dot plot).

I used an apple icon (created by Creative Stall), an orange icon (created by Gui Zamarioli), and a tomato icon (created by Andrey Vasiliev); all obtained from The Noun Project.

  1. Color the icons.

After downloading the icons, I used Gimp, a free image manipulation program, to color each of the icons. I created a green version, and a blue version of each icon. (The request asked for the two different years to have different colors.) I also cropped the icons.

Given that there were only three icons, doing this manually was not much of a time burden (10 minutes after I selected the color palette—using Could this be done programatically? I am not sure. A person, who is not me, might be able to write some commands to do this with ImageMagick or some other program. You might also be able to do this in R, but I sure don’t know how…I imagine it involves re-writing the values for the pixels you want to change the color of, but how you determine which of those you want is beyond me.

If you are interested in only changing the color of the icon outline, an alternative would be to download the SVGs rather than the PNGs. Opening the SVG file in a text editor gives the underlying syntax for the SVG. For example, the apple icon looks like this:

<svg xmlns="" xmlns:xlink="" version="1.1" x="0px" y="0px" viewBox="0 0 48 60" enable-background="new 0 0 48 48" xml:space="preserve">
    <path d="M19.749,48c-1.662... />
    <path d="M24.001,14.866c-0.048, ... />
    <path d="M29.512, ... />
<text x="0" y="63" fill="#000000" font-size="5px" font-weight="bold" font-family="'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial-Unicode, Arial, Sans-serif">Created by Creative Stall</text><text x="0" y="68" fill="#000000" font-size="5px" font-weight="bold" font-family="'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial-Unicode, Arial, Sans-serif">from the Noun Project</text>

The three path commands draw the actual apple. The first draws the apple, the second path command draws the leaf on top of the apple, and the third draws the stem. Adding the text, fill=”blue” to the end of each path command will change the color of the path from black to blue (see below).

<svg xmlns="" xmlns:xlink="" version="1.1" x="0px" y="0px" viewBox="0 0 48 60" enable-background="new 0 0 48 48" xml:space="preserve">
    <path d="M19.749,48c-1.662 ... fill="blue" />
    <path d="M24.001,14.866c-0.048, ... fill="blue" />
    <path d="M29.512, ... fill="blue" />
<text x="0" y="63" fill="#000000" font-size="5px" font-weight="bold" font-family="'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial-Unicode, Arial, Sans-serif">Created by Creative Stall</text><text x="0" y="68" fill="#000000" font-size="5px" font-weight="bold" font-family="'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial-Unicode, Arial, Sans-serif">from the Noun Project</text>

This could easily be programmatically changed. Then the SVG images could also programmatically be exported to PNGs.

  1. Read in the icons (which are PNG files).

Here we use the readPNG() function from the png library to bring the icon into R.

blue_apple = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/blue_apple.png", TRUE)
green_apple = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/green_apple.png", TRUE)
blue_orange = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/blue_orange.png", TRUE)
green_orange = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/green_orange.png", TRUE)
blue_tomato = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/blue_tomato.png", TRUE)
green_tomato = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/green_tomato.png", TRUE)
  1. Create the data.

Use the data.frame() function to create the data.

plotData = data.frame(
&nbsp; year = c(1995, 1995, 1995, 2000, 2000, 2000),
&nbsp; crop = c("tomato", "apple", "orange", "tomato", "apple", "orange"),
&nbsp; yield = c(250, 300, 500, 600, 800, 900)

  year   crop yield
1 1995 tomato   250
2 1995  apple   300
3 1995 orange   500
4 2000 tomato   600
5 2000  apple   800
6 2000 orange   900

Next we will add a column to our data frame that maps the year to color. This uses the ifelse() function. In this example, if the logical statement plotData$year == 1995 evaluates as TRUE, then the value will be “blue”. If it evaluates as FALSE, then the value will be “green”.

plotData$color = ifelse(plotData$year == 1995, "blue", "green")

  year   crop yield color
1 1995 tomato   250  blue
2 1995  apple   300  blue
3 1995 orange   500  blue
4 2000 tomato   600 green
5 2000  apple   800 green
6 2000 orange   900 green

Now we will use this new “color” column in conjunction with the “crop” column to identify the icon that will be plotted for each row. the paste0() function concatenates each argument together with no spaces between them. Here we are concatenating the color value, an underscore, and the crop value.

plotData$icon = paste0(plotData$color, "_", plotData$crop)

  year   crop yield color         icon
1 1995 tomato   250  blue  blue_tomato
2 1995  apple   300  blue   blue_apple
3 1995 orange   500  blue  blue_orange
4 2000 tomato   600 green green_tomato
5 2000  apple   800 green  green_apple
6 2000 orange   900 green green_orange
  1. Use ggplot to create a scatterplot of the data, making the size of the points 0.

p = ggplot(data = plotData, aes(x = year, y = yield)) +
  geom_point(size = 0) +
  theme_bw() +
  xlab("Year") +
  1. Use a for() loop to add annotation_custom() layers (one for each point) that contain the image.

Similar to the previous post, we add new layers (in our case each layer will be an additional point) by recursively adding the layer and then writing this into p. The key is that the image name is now in the “icon” column of the data frame. The values in the “icon” column are character data. To make R treat these as objects we first parse the character data using the parse() function, and then we use eval() to have R evaluate the parsed expression. A description of this appears in this Stack Overflow question.


for(i in 1:nrow(plotData)){
  p = p + annotation_custom(
    rasterGrob(eval(parse(text = plotData$icon[i]))),
    xmin = plotData$year[i] - 20, xmax = plotData$year[i] + 20, 
    ymin = plotData$yield[i] - 20, ymax = plotData$yield[i] + 20

# Show plot
  1. Some issues to consider and my alternative plot.

I think that plot is what was requested, but since I cannot help myself, I would propose a few changes that I think would make this plot better. First, I would add lines to connect each fruit (apple in 1995 to apple in 2000). This would help the reader to better track the change in yield over time.

Secondly, I would actually leave the fruit color constant across years and vary the color between fruits (probably coloring them according to their real-world colors). This again helps the reader in that they can more easily identify the fruits and also helps them track the change in yield. (It also avoids a Stroop-like effect of coloring an orange some other color than orange!)

Here is the code:

# Read in PNG files
apple = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/red_apple.png", TRUE)
orange = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/orange_orange.png", TRUE)
tomato = readPNG("~/Desktop/fruit-plot/red_tomato.png", TRUE)

# Plot
p2 = ggplot(data = plotData, aes(x = year, y = yield)) +
  geom_point(size = 0) +
  geom_line(aes(group = crop), lty = "dashed") +
  theme_bw()  +
  xlab("Year") +
  ylab("Yield") +
  annotate("text", x = 1997, y = 350, label = "Tomato created by Andrey Vasiliev from the Noun Project", size = 2, hjust = 0) +
  annotate("text", x = 1997, y = 330, label = "Apple created by Creative Stall from the Noun Project", size = 2, hjust = 0) +
  annotate("text", x = 1997, y = 310, label = "Orange created by Gui Zamarioli from the Noun Project", size = 2, hjust = 0)

for(i in 1:nrow(plotData)){
  p2 = p2 + annotation_custom(
    rasterGrob(eval(parse(text = as.character(plotData$crop[i])))),
    xmin = plotData$year[i] - 20, xmax = plotData$year[i] + 20, 
    ymin = plotData$yield[i] -20, ymax = plotData$yield[i]+20

# Show plot

And the result…


Halloween: An Excuse for Plotting with Icons

In my course on the GLM, we are discussing residual plots this week. Given that it is also Halloween this Saturday, it seems like a perfect time to code up a residual plot made of ghosts.

Ghost plotThe process I used to create this plot is as follows:

  1. Find an icon that you want to use in place of the points on your scatterplot (or dot plot).

I used a ghost icon (created by Andrea Mazzini) obtained from The Noun Project. After downloading the icon, I used Preview to create a new PNG file that had cut out the citation text in the downloaded image. I will add the citation text at a later stage in the plot itself. This new icon was 450×450 pixels.

  1. Use ggplot to create a scatterplot of a set of data, making the size of the points 0.

Here is the code that will create the data and make the plot that I used.

plotData = data.frame(
  .fitted = c(76.5, 81.3, 75.5, 79.5, 80.1, 78.5, 79.5, 77.5, 81.2, 80.4, 78.1, 79.5, 76.6, 79.4, 75.9, 86.6, 84.2, 83.1, 82.4, 78.4, 81.6, 79.6, 80.4, 82.3, 78.6, 82.1, 76.6, 82.1, 87, 82.2, 82.1, 87.2, 80.5, 84.9, 78.5, 79, 78.5, 81.5, 77.4, 76.8, 79.4, 75.5, 80.2, 80.4, 81.5, 81.5, 80.5, 79.2, 82.2, 83, 78.5, 79.2, 80.6, 78.6, 85.9, 76.5, 77.5, 84.1, 77.6, 81.2, 74.8, 83.4, 80.4, 77.6, 78.6, 83.3, 80.4, 80.5, 80.4, 83.8, 85.1, 82.2, 84.1, 80.2, 75.7, 83, 81.5, 83.1, 78.3, 76.9, 82, 82.3, 85.8, 78.5, 75.9, 80.4, 82.3, 75.7, 73.9, 80.4, 83.2, 85.2, 84.9, 80.4, 85.9, 76.8, 83.3, 80.2, 83.1, 77.6),
  .stdresid = c(0.2, -0.3, 0.5, 1.4, 0.3, -0.2, 1.2, -1.1, 0.7, -0.1, -0.3, -1.1, -1.5, -0.1, 0, -1, 1, 0.3, -0.5, 0.5, 1.8, 1.6, -0.1, -1.3, -0.2, -0.9, 1.1, -0.2, 1.5, -0.3, -1.2, -0.6, -0.4, -3, 0.5, 0.3, -0.8, 0.8, 0.5, 1.3, 1.8, 0.5, -1.6, -2, -2.1, -0.8, 0.4, -0.9, 0.4, -0.4, 0.6, 0.4, 1.4, -1.4, 1.3, 0.4, -0.8, -0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.5, 0.1, 0.1, -0.8, -2.1, 0, 1.9, -0.5, -0.1, -1.4, 0.6, 0.7, -0.3, 1, -0.7, 0.7, -0.2, 0.8, 1.3, -0.7, -0.4, 1.5, 2.1, 1.6, -1, 0.7, -1, 0.9, -0.3, 0.9, -0.3, -0.7, -0.9, -0.2, 1.2, -0.8, -0.9, -1.7, 0.6, -0.5)


p = ggplot(data = plotData, aes(x = .fitted, y = .stdresid)) +
    theme_bw() + 
    geom_hline(yintercept = 0) +
    geom_point(size = 0) +
    theme_bw() +
    xlab("Fitted values") +
    ylab("Standarized Residuals") +
    annotate("text", x = 76, y = -3, label = "Ghost created by Andrea Mazzini from Noun Project")
  1. Read in the icon (which is a PNG file).

Here we use the readPNG() function from the png library to bring the icon into R.

ghost = readPNG("/Users/andrewz/Desktop/ghost.png", TRUE)
  1. Use a for() loop to add annotation_custom() layers (one for each point) that contain the image.

The idea is that since we have saved our plot in the object p, we can add new layers (in our case each layer will be an additional point) by recursively adding the layer and then writing this into p. The pseudo-like code for this is:

for(i in 1:nrow(plotData)){
    p = p + 
        xmin = minimum_x_value_for_the_image, 
        xmax = maximum_x_value_for_the_image, 
        ymin = minimum_y_value_for_the_image, 
        ymax = maximum_y_value_for_the_image

In order for the image to be plotted, we first have to make it plot-able by making it a graphical object, or GROB.

The rasterGrob() function (found in the grid,/b> package) renders a bitmap image (raster image) into a graphical object or GROB which can then be displayed at a specified location, orientation, etc. Read more about using Raster images in R here.

The arguments xmin, xmax, ymin, and ymax give the horizontal and vertical locations (in data coordinates) of the raster image. In our residual plot, we want the center of the image to be located at the coordinates (.fitted, .stdresid). In the syntax below, we add a small bit to the maximum values and subtract a small bit from the minimum values to force the icon into a box that will plot the icons a bit smaller than their actual size. (#protip: play around with this value until you get a plot that looks good.)


for(i in 1:nrow(plotData)){
    p = p + annotation_custom(
      xmin = plotData$.fitted[i]-0.2, xmax = plotData$.fitted[i]+0.2, 
      ymin = plotData$.stdresid[i]-0.2, ymax = plotData$.stdresid[i]+0.2

Finally we print the plot to our graphics device using


And the result is eerily pleasant!

Research Hack: Obtaining an RSS Feed for Websites without RSS Feeds

In one of our older posts, I wrote about using feedreaders and aggregators to keep up-to-date on blogs, journals, etc. These work great when the site you want to read have an RSS feed. RSS (Rich Site Summary) is simply a format that retrieves updated content from a webpage. A feedreader (or aggregator) grabs the “feed” and displays the updated content for you to read. No more having to visit the website daily to see if something changed or was updated.

Many sites have an RSS feed and make the process of adding the content to your feedreader fairly painless. In general the process works something like this…look for the RSS icon, click it, and choose the reader you want to send the content to, and click subscribe.

Subscribing to an RSS Feed

Subscribing to an RSS Feed

But what about sites that do not have an RSS feed explicitly in place? It turns out that there are third-party applications that can piece together an RSS feed for these sites as well. There are several of these applications available online. I have used Page2RSS and had pretty good luck.

Page2RSSJust enter the URL of the site you want to keep tabs on into the “Page URL” box and click the “to RSS” button. This will produce another URL that can be copied and pasted into your feedreader or subscribed to directly.

I have successfully used this to add RSS feeds from many sites and journals to my feedreader. Below is a shot from Feedly (my current reader) on my iPad Mini of updated content (as of this morning) on the Journal of Statistics Education website.

JSE on Feedly

PDF and Citation Management

A new academic year looms. This means a new crop of graduate students will begin their academic training. PDF management is a critical tool that all graduate students need to use and the sooner the better. Often these tools go hand-in-hand with a citation management system, which is also critical for graduate students.

Using a citation management software makes scholarly work easier and more effective. First and foremost, these tools allow you to automatically cite references for a paper in a wide range of bibliographic styles. They also allow you to organize, evaluate, annotate, and search within your citation collection and share your references with others. Often they also sync across machines and devices allowing you to access your database wherever you are.

There are several tools available for PDF/citation management, including:

Some of these are citation managers only (BibDesk). Many allow you to also manage your PDF files as well; naming, organizing, and moving your files to a central repository on your computer. Some allow for annotation within the software as well. There are several online comparisons of some of the different systems ( e.g., Penn LibrariesUW Madison Library, etc.) From my experience, students tend to choose either Mendelay or Zotero—my guess is because they are free.

There is a lot to be said for free software, and both Zotero and Mendelay seem pretty solid. However, as a graduate student you should understand that you are investing in your future. This type of tool, I think it is fair to say, you will be using daily. Spending money on a tool that has the features and UI that you will want to use is perfectly ok and should even be encouraged.

Another consideration for students who are beginning the process is to find out what your advisor(s), and research groups use. Although many are cross-compatible, using and learning the tool is easier with a group helping you.

What Do I Use?

I use Papers. It is not free (a student license is ~$50). When I started using Papers, Mendelay and Zotero were not available. I actually have since used both Mendelay and Zotero for a while, but then ultimately made the decision this summer to switch back to Papers. It is faster and more importantly to me, has better search functionality, both across and within a paper.

I would like to use Sente (free for up to 100 references), but the search function is very limited. In my opinion, Sente has the best is sleek and minimalist and reading a paper is a nice experience.

My Recommendation…

Ultimately, use what you are comfortable with and then, actually use it. Take the time to enter ALL the meta-data for PDFs as you accumulate them. Don’t imagine you will have time to do it later…you won’t. Being organized with your references from the start will keep you more productive later.


Willful Ignorance [Book Review]

I just finished reading Willful Ignorance: The Mismeasure of Uncertainty by Herbert Weisberg. I gave this book five stars (out of five) on Goodreads.

According to Weisberg, the text can be

“regarded as two books in one. On one hand it is a history of a big idea: how we have come to think about uncertainty. On the other, it is a prescription for change, especially with regard to how we perform research in the biomedical and social sciences” (p. xi).

Willful ignorance is the idea that to deal with uncertainty, statisticians simplify the situation by filtering out or ignoring much of what we know…we willfully ignore some information in order to quantify the amount of uncertainty.

The book gives a cogent history and evolution of the ideas and history of probability, tackling head-on the questions: what is probability, how did we come to our current understanding of probability, and how did mathematical probability come to represent uncertainty and ambiguity.

Although Weisberg presents a nice historical perspective, the book is equally philosophical. In some ways it is a more leisurely read of the material found in Hacking, and in many ways more compelling.

I learned a great deal from this book. In many places I found myself re-reading sections and spiraling back to previously read sections to read them with some new understanding. I may even try to assign parts of it to the undergraduates I am teaching this summer.

This book would make a wonderful beach read for anyone interested in randomness, or uncertainty, or any academic hipster.

Fitbit Revisited

Many moons ago we wrote about a bit of a kludge to get data from a Fitbit (see here). Now it looks as though there is a much better way. Cory Nissen has written an R package to scrape Fitbit data and posted it on GitHub. He also wrote a blog post on his blog Stats and Things announcing the package and demonstrating its use. While I haven’t tried it yet, it looks pretty straight-forward and much easier than anything else i have seen to date.

Annual Review of Reading

It is that time of year…time to review the previous year; make top 10 lists; and resolve to be a better person in 2015. I will tackle the first, but only of my reading habits. In 2014 I read 46 books for a grand total of 17,480 pages. (Note: I do not count academic books for work in this list, only books I read for recreation.) This is a yearly high, at least since I have been tracking this data on GoodReads (since late 2010). You can read an older annual report of reading here.

Year Books Pages
2011 45 15,332
2012 29 9,203
2013 45 15,887
2014 46 17,480

Since I have accumulated four years worth of data, I thought I might do some comparative analysis of my reading over this time period.

When am I reading?

plot2The trend displayed here was somewhat surprising when I looked at it—at least related to the decline in reading over the summer months. Although, reflecting on it, it maybe should not have been as surprising. There is a slight uptick around the month of May (when spring semester ends) and the decline begins in June/July. Not only do summer classes begin, but I also try to do a few house and garden projects over the summer months. This uptick and decline are still visible when a plot of the number of pages (rather than the number of books) is examined, albeit much smaller (1,700 pages in May and 1,200 pages in the summer months). This might indicate I read longer books in the summer. For example, one of the books I read this last summer was Neal “I don’t know the meaning of the word ‘brevity'” Stephenson’s Reamde, which clocked in at a mere 1,044 pages.

Was I reading books that I ultimately enjoyed?

plot3I also plotted my monthly average rating (on a five-point scale) for the four years of data. This plot shows that 2014 is an anomaly. I apparently read trash in the summer (which is what you are supposed to do). The previous three years I read the most un-noteworthy books in the fall. Or, I just rated them lower because school had started again.

Am I more critical than other readers? Is this consistent throughout the year?

I also looked at how other GoodReads readers had rated those same books. The months represent when I read the book. (I didn’t look at when the book was read by other readers, although that would be interesting to see if time of year has an effect on rating.) The scale on the y-axis is the residual between my rating and the average GoodReads rating. My ratings are generally close to the average, sometimes higher, sometimes lower. There are, however, many books that I rated much lower than average. The loess smooth suggests that July–November is when I am most critical relative to other readers.


Yikes…It’s Been Awile

Apparently our last blog post was in August. Dang. Where did five months go? Blog guilt would be killing me, but I swear it was just yesterday that Mine posted.

I will give a bit of review of some of the books that I read this semester related to statistics. Most recently, I finished Hands-On Matrix Algebra Using R: Active and Motivated Learning with Applications. This was a fairly readable book for those looking to understand a bit of matrix algebra. The emphasis is definitely in economics, but their are some statistics examples as well. I am not as sure where the “motivated learning” part comes in, but the examples are practical and the writing is pretty coherent.

The two books that I read that I am most excited about are Model Based Inference in the Life Sciences: A Primer on Evidence and The Psychology of Computer Programming. The latter, written in the 70’s, explored psychological aspects of computer programming, especially in industry, and on increasing productivity. Weinberg (the author) stated his purpose in the book was to study “computer programming as a human activity.” This was compelling on many levels to me, not the least of which is to better understand how students learn statistics when using software such as R.

Reading this book, along with participating in a student-led computing club in our department has sparked some interest to begin reading the literature related to these ideas this spring semester (feel free to join us…maybe we will document our conversations as we go). I am very interested in how instructor’s choose software to teach with (see concerns raised about using R in Harwell (2014). Not so fast my friend: The rush to R and the need for rigorous evaluation of data analysis and software in education. Education Research Quarterly.) I have also thought long and hard about not only what influences the choice of software to use in teaching (I do use R), but also about subsequent choices related to that decision (e.g., if R is adopted, which R packages will be introduced to students). All of these choices probably have some impact on student learning and also on students’ future practice (what you learn in graduate school is what you ultimately end up doing).

The Model Based Inference book was a shorter, readable version of Burnham and Anderson’s (2003) Springer volume on multimodel inference and information theory. I was introduced to these ideas when I taught out of Jeff Long’s, Longitudinal Data Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences Using R. They remained with me for several years and after reading Anderson’s book, I am going to teach some of these ideas in our advanced methods course this spring.

Anyway…just some short thoughts to leave you with. Happy Holidays.

Pie Charts. Are they worth the Fight?

Like Rob, I recently got back from ICOTS. What a great conference. Kudos to everyone who worked hard to organize and pull it off. In one of the sessions I was at, Amelia McNamara (@AmeliaMN) gave a nice presentation about how they were using data and computer science in high schools as a part of the Mobilize Project. At one point in the presentation she had a slide that showed a screenshot of the dashboard used in one of their apps. It looked something like this.


During the Q&A, one of the critiques of the project was that they had displayed the data as a donut plot. “Pie charts (or any kin thereof) = bad” was the message. I don’t really want to fight about whether they are good, nor bad—the reality is probably in between. (Tufte, the most cited source to the ‘pie charts are bad’ rhetoric, never really said pie charts were bad, only that given the space they took up they were, perhaps less informative than other graphical choices.) Do people have trouble reading radians? Sure. Is the message in the data obscured because of this? Most of the time, no.

plots_1Here, is the bar chart (often the better alternative to the pie chart that is offered) and the donut plot for the data shown in the Mobilize dashboard screenshot? The message is that most of the advertisements were from posters and billboards. If people are interested in the n‘s, that can be easily remedied by including them explicitly on the plot—which neither the bar plot nor donut plot has currently. (The dashboard displays the actual numbers when you hover over the donut slice.)

It seems we are wasting our breath constantly criticizing people for choosing pie charts. Whether we like it or not, the public has adopted pie charts. (As is pointed out in this blog post, Leland Wilkinson even devotes a whole chapter to pie charts in his Grammar of Graphics book.) Maybe people are reasonably good at pulling out the often-not-so-subtle differences that are generally shown in a pie chart. After all, it isn’t hard to understand (even when using a 3-D exploding pie chart) that the message in this pie chart is that the “big 3” browsers have a strong hold on the market.

The bigger issue to me is that these types of graphs are only reasonable choices when examining simple group differences—the marginals. Isn’t life, and data, more complex than that?Is the distribution of browser type the same for Mac and PC users? For males and females? For different age groups? These are the more interesting questions.

The dashboard addresses this through interactivity between the multiple donut charts. Clicking a slice in the first plot, shows the distribution of product types (the second plot) for those ads that fit the selected slice—the conditional distributions.

So it is my argument, that rather than referring to a graph choice as good or bad, we instead focus on the underlying question prompting the graph in the first place. Mobilize acknowledges that complexity by addressing the need for conditional distributions. Interactivity and computing make the choice of pie charts a reasonable choice to display this.

*If those didn’t persuade you, perhaps you will be swayed by the food argument. Donuts and pies are two of my favorite food groups. Although bars are nice too. For a more tasty version of the donut plot, perhaps somebody should come up with a cronut plot.

**The ggplot2 syntax for the bar and donut plot are provided below. The syntax for the donut plot were adapted from this blog post.

# Input the ad data
ad = data.frame(
	type = c("Poster", "Billboard", "Bus", "Digital"),
	n = c(529, 356, 59, 81)

# Bar plot
ggplot(data = ad, aes(x = type, y = n, fill = type)) +
     geom_bar(stat = "identity", show_guide = FALSE) +

# Add addition columns to data, needed for donut plot.
ad$fraction = ad$n / sum(ad$n)
ad$ymax = cumsum(ad$fraction)
ad$ymin = c(0, head(ad$ymax, n = -1))

# Donut plot
ggplot(data = ad, aes(fill = type, ymax = ymax, ymin = ymin, xmax = 4, xmin = 3)) +
     geom_rect(colour = "grey30", show_guide = FALSE) +
     coord_polar(theta = "y") +
     xlim(c(0, 4)) +
     theme_bw() +
     theme(panel.grid=element_blank()) +
     theme(axis.text=element_blank()) +
     theme(axis.ticks=element_blank()) +
     geom_text(aes(x = 3.5, y = ((ymin+ymax)/2), label = type)) +
     xlab("") +



Increasing the Numbers of Females in STEM

I just read a wonderful piece written about how the Harvey Mudd increased the ratio of females declaring a major in Computer Science from 10% to 40% since 2006. That is awesome!

One of the things that they attribute this success to is changing the name of their introductory course. They renamed the course from Introduction to programming in Java to Creative Approaches to Problem Solving in Science and Engineering using Python.

Now, clearly, they changed the language they were using (literally) as well,from Java to Python, but it does beg the question, “what’s in a name?” According to Jim Croce and Harvey Mudd, a lot. If you don’t believe that, just ask anyone who has been in a class with the moniker Data Science, or any publisher who has published a book recently entitled [Insert anything here] Using R.

It would be interesting to study the effect of changing a course name. Are there words or phrases that attract more students to the course (e.g., creative, problem solving)?  Are there gender differences? How long does the effect last? Is it a flash-in-the-pan? Or does it continue to attract students after a short time period? (My guess is that the teacher plays a large role in the continued attraction of students to the course.)

Looking at the effects of a name is not new. Stephen Dubner and Steve Levitt of Freakonomics fame have illuminated folks about research about whether a child’s name has an effect on a variety of outcomes such as educational achievement and future income [podcast], and suggest that it isn’t as predictive as some people believe. Perhaps someone could use some of their ideas and methods to examine the effect of course names.

Has anyone tried this with statistics (aside from Data Science)? I know Harvard put in place a course called Real Life Statistics: Your Chance for Happiness (or Misery) which got good numbers of students (and a lot of press). My sense is that this happens much more in liberal arts schools (David Moore’s Concepts and Controversies book springs to mind). What would good course words or phrases for statistics include? Evidence. Uncertainty. Data. Variation. Visualization. Understanding. Although these are words that statisticians use constantly, I have to admit they all sound better than An Introduction to Statistics.